The Trump administration is appealing a court ruling that blocked the Keystone XL oil pipeline.

Justice Department attorneys on Friday appealed the November ruling from U.S. District Judge Brian Morris that for the 1,184-mile (1,900-kilometer) pipeline.

The line sponsored by Calgary-based TransCanada would begin in Alberta and shuttle as much as 830,000 barrels a day of crude through a half dozen states to terminals on the Gulf Coast.

It was rejected by former President Barack Obama in 2015. That decision was reversed in 2017 by President Donald Trump, who has promoted the $8 billion project as part of his effort to boost American energy industries.

After environmental groups sued, Morris said the administration had not fully considered potential oil spills and other impacts and that further reviews were needed.

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With the Keystone XL pipeline construction set to begin soon officials in Butte County are preparing for the possibility of protests over the construction of the pipeline by securing more jail cells.

The Black Hills Pioneer reports that the Butte County Commission approved an agreement last month to use Falk County's jail systems if necessary.

The move comes as TransCanada plans to start construction on the oil pipeline this year. Many environmental groups and Native American tribes have sought to block the project because of environmental concerns.

Butte County currently holds its inmates at the Meade County Jail in Sturgis. The pipeline will also run through that county.

Butte County Sheriff Fred Lamphere says he's concerned that the jail would fill up quickly should civil disturbances occur.