I'm a television addict. I have no problem admitting that I watch way too much TV. It started when I was a little kid and it has only gotten worse as I have (shall we say) "matured."

I even have certain nights and shows on my "must watch" list. Unless of course reruns are in progress. Thursday nights I always have a date with Don Wildman and Mysteries at the Museum on the Travel Channel.

How this hour-long history lesson ended up there instead of on the History Channel, I'll never know, but then again, I don't particularly care. Anywhere this gem airs, I will watch it and quite often re-watch it, when it runs in repeats on weekends and elsewhere.

The premise behind the show is to highlight a museum artifact, relic, heirloom, etc., and piece together its often unknown historical significance, sometimes involving everything from political intrigue to murder! There are usually four to five segments per hour-long program. So you're getting numerous short history lessons and updates every week.

Even if you're not a history buff, the show is always fascinating, as you travel the planet to museums near and far. (That is apparently the "travel" connection, although travel to these places is never truly the focus).

Last night (February 8) it was nearing 10:00 PM and the second new episode was airing its final segment, which began with the words, "Sioux Falls, South Dakota..." and an aerial drone flyover of the falls. (I snapped out of my historical stupor!) This was closely followed by the words "National Field Archery Association (NFAA) Foundation Archery Museum in Yankton, South Dakota."

The remarkable story focused on a bow which was fashioned for use by paralympians and is now housed there in Yankton. The tale really focused on Dr. Ludwig Guttmann, a German-born, British neurosurgeon, who organised the first athletic competition for disabled former service people during the 1948 Olympic Games.

This competition was the predecessor of the Paralympic Games as they exist today! Interesting, huh? That's what I thought!

Sources: Mysteries at the Museum, Paralympics History, NFAA Foundation Archery Museum  


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