The 'It' is scaring up big numbers at the box office and showing no signs of slowing down as Halloween approaches. The horror flick has earned another $60 million over the weekend making it the number-one movie for two straight weeks. Its 10-day total stands at $218.7 million.

If you're a parent, there's a good chance you've heard from your son or daughter that absolutely everyone in their class is going to the movie. That presents a conundrum for mom and dad. Do you let your kids go see 'It'?

Before we press on, keep in mind that the movie is Rated R. If one needs a refresher course in the ratings system, the Motion Picture Association of America classifies Rated R as Restricted – under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

So technically, your kids and young teens can get in the movie with a parent or legal guardian.

For parents such as myself, I read the Stephen King novel back in the 80's and was more than a little unnerved by the premise of an evil clown roaming the streets of a small town. Never walk past a storm drain during a rainstorm. The first movie based on the popular novel was released in 1990. It wasn't great, but it was alright. Tim Curry played the role well enough to spook the devil out of you when you saw a clown with a red balloon for years to come.

The latest 'It' movie (2017) really ramps up the horror. I'm told that the language is very strong, and the blood and gore is extremely amplified from it's 27 year-old predecessor. And then there's the uncomfortable orgy scene from the novel.

Personally speaking, I've never taken my sons, 11 and 13, to a rated R movie. As I've told them, I'm not sure that's a solid parenting move on my part. However, every parent knows when their kids are ready for an intense movie fueled by peer-pressure in the halls of school.

While my boys continue to ask to see the movie, I don't have to worry about my daughter on this one. She's shrieked at the sight of clowns since she was 3. So bad in fact, that we couldn't even attend the circus when she was little.

Use your own judgement, moms and dads, on whether your kids are ready for a horror film of this level. Or you can wait until the edited-for-TV version hits cable.

Here is the trailer that been fueling the popularity with young people. It's been viewed over 21 million times on Youtube.